Boycott Boohoo, or Hunt for Bargains? What Will Consumers Do?

Paul J. Carlson

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LONDON — After a rough few weeks, Boohoo’s share price is bouncing back, but the question remains whether its young consumer base will keep buying from the brand, which has been dogged by allegations of poor labor practices and unfair pay at one of its supplier’s factories in Leicester, England.

It remains to be seen whether the scandal will bring forth any meaningful change, or encourage consumers to stop before they shop, and think about the clothing brand, or retailer’s, ethics. Or will the controversy just be forgotten in a few months’ time, with boohoo.com’s young clientele once again turning to the retailer for cheap alternatives to the trends they spot on social media?

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iStock/The Independent
iStock/The Independent

The affordability of clothing coupled with #ootd culture leads many of us to think we need a new outfit whenever we leave our homes. And when it comes to fast fashion, we all plead guilty to it one way or another – either by buying Zara’s polka dot dress last summer or copping Mango’s Bottega Veneta inspired clutch bag.

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